Archive for the 'News' Category

#Throwback Thursday: Horton Hears KU Event

by Sarah Berry

Take a look back at the March 2014 event to celebrate Dr. Seuss’ classic, “Horton Hears a Who.”

The More You Know...

by Dale Bond

A Recap of the Horton Hears KU Event

P1010577 This is Max.

P1010592 Max was very worried none of his friends would come to his party.
“Sigh. Nobody’s here.”

P1010578 Wait a second, Max. Look behind you!

P1010579 “My friends!!”

P1010580 “Let the party begin!”

P1010581 At the party, there were lots of yummy snacks. Max ate a lot.

P1010582 Max, did you eat all of that cake?!

P1010583

P1010584 “Maaaaaybe….”

P1010585 Max read lots of his favorite books at the party.

P1010586 And made tons of new friends!

P1010587 So did Horton…

P1010588 …and Fox in Socks…

P1010590 …and even mean old Yertle the Turtle!

P1010594 Everyone had a grand old time!

P1010601 “And look! There are my friends who planned this whole thing!”

P1010595 “I can’t wait until the next party!”

Lorax says

Our thanks to Dean Garber from the College of Education for sponsoring the snacks!

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Starving the Beast:The defunding of America’s public universities

by Sarah Berry

Earning its title from the political strategy of limiting government spending by cutting taxes (and therefore revenue), the documentary “Starving the Beast,” provides an in-depth examination of the ongoing power struggle between public universities and political representatives, in regards to funding, which has led to budget cuts and higher tuition rates for students.

Public universities like the University of Texas, Texas A&M, and the University of Virginia are featured throughout the documentary, which examines two opposing views of public education: one, that it is a public good to be supported by society and the other, that the cost of public education should be met by individual degree-earners and private entities.

starving thebeast.jpg

To begin watching “Starving the Beast,” click here. If you are accessing Kanopy Streaming off-campus, view our blog post, Accessing Library Resources Off-Campus, for more information.

Celebrate Louisa May Alcott’s 184th Birthday!

Google's Image for November 29, 2016

by Sarah Berry

Today marks acclaimed novelist Louisa May Alcott’s 184th birthday. Born in Germantown, Pennsylvania, Alcott was best known for “Little Women,” which  was loosely based on Alcott’s own life. Since the books release, it has been adapted for film several times, in 1933, 1949, and most recently in 1994; the novel has also been adapted for television and stage.

Through the Rohrbach Library, students can access several resources relating to Alcott’s work. For example, via Britannica Original Sources, students can read three of Alcott’s works: “Little Women,” “Little Men,” and “Flower Fables, while Films OnDemand offers the 1949 film, “Little Women.” Alternatively, students can search EBSCOhost for Alcott’s works and as well as analyses of Alcott and her contribution to literature.

lma

For information on accessing databases and library resources off campus, check out our blog post, Accessing Library Resources Off-Campus, for more information.

The Presidential Pardon for Turkeys

by Sarah Berry

Considered the least favorite holiday of the year (for turkeys at least), for two turkeys the holiday is worth celebrating, thanks to a presidential pardon. Headed by the National Turkey Federation, two turkeys are selected for pardoning based on their appearance and temperament.

Afterwards, the birds reside on a farm for the remainder of the lives. Often though, the turkeys only live one to two years due to their breeding and care prior to being pardoned. For example, the diet of factory farm turkeys is designed to fatten them, which strains their organs and wears on their bone structure.

While organizations like PETA have voiced concern over these farming practices and White House ceremony, the National Turkey Federation has remained staunch in its support of the event.

ce25fc8917d7289b2a8c5100c82c8c55

Prior to the presidential turkey pardoning, turkeys were pitched by Benjamin Franklin to be the national bird of the United States.

 

Thus, President Obama will be pardoning the final two turkeys of his presidency this week, before the turkeys are moved to Virginia Tech where they will be chaperoned by a poultry immunologist from the college’s Agriculture and Life Sciences Department.

To learn more about the presidential turkey pardon, check out the links below:

The end of Daylight Savings Time leads to a rise in pedestrian deaths

by Sarah Berry

The beloved (albeit temporary) end of Daylight Savings Time will take place this Sunday, November 6, 2016 at 2 a.m. With an additional hour seemingly in the day, there’s a variety of things to do, such as taking a walk around the neighborhood.

However, according to The Huffington Post, you may want to rethink going for a walk after November 6. In a study published on Science Direct (a database available through the Rohrbach Library), scientists discovered that the transition from Daylight Savings Time to Daylight Standard Time correlates to the highest percentage of pedestrian deaths by cars.

pedestrian-crossing

In New York alone, 40 percent of pedestrian deaths occurred between October and December. Scientists believe the higher death rate is due to the nights becoming darker earlier, while the roads are still filled with drivers commuting to and from work.

Additionally, scientists found that the shift to Daylight Standard Time leads to people staying up later (with the idea of “gaining” an hour back) and can lead to drivers being less aware of their surroundings due to sleep deprivation.

Specifically, the study found on Sunday, the day immediately after the shift to Daylight Standard Time, that fatal accidents increased from an average of 126 to 139. Fortunately, the study did find that instead of increasing over the years, the amount of fatal accidents has decreased for the Sunday following the conclusion of Daylight Savings Time.

To be safe though, maybe opt for a Sunday morning of Netflix this year.

behind-the-screens-110815-netflix

 

Conducted by Stanford University, the study analyzed 21 years of fatal automobile accidents in the U.S. For more information, click here. Select the full-text link in the upper-right corner to be taken to Science Direct to view the full study and article.

If you are accessing the database off-campus, view our blog post, Accessing Library Resources Off-Campus, for more information.

The Keystone News highlights the Rohrbach Library’s zine display

by Sarah Berry

Check out the article by Gabriela Laracca at The Keystone News on the Rohrbach Library’s Zine display!

By Gabriela Laracca

On Oct. 5 at 3:30 p.m., the Rohrbach Library hosted the opening of KU’s Zine Library with a zine debut by senior Shannon McCarthy. The Zine Library, which is displayed across from the library’s café on the main floor, was created by KU senior, Jesse Warner.

McCarthy’s zine was an interpretation of Wolfgang Borchert’s German play, ‘The Man Outside,’ originally known as ‘Draußen vor der Tür.’ McCarthy created her zine for German professor Lynn Kutch’s German graphic novel class.

This zine was one of many hosted at the Zine Library. By definition, a zine (pronounced zeen,) is a DIY publication that is self-published and released on a small scale with usually less than 100 copies created.

Due to the nature of a zine’s publication, authors/artists are free to explore the vast possibilities of what their zine can be about, what it could look like and the tone…

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#Throwback Thursday – Remember MC Kwanamak?

by Sarah Berry

For the full backstory on the 2014 April Fool’s joke, check out Dale Bond’s post, “Rap Attack at Rohrbach: Introducing MC Kwanamak.”


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