Women in History

Counting on Katherine – “You’ve likely heard of the historic Apollo 13 [mission]. But do you know about the mathematical genius who made sure that Apollo 13 returned safely home? As a child, Katherine Johnson loved to count. She counted the steps on the road, the number of dishes and spoons she washed in the kitchen sink, everything! Boundless, curious, and excited by calculations, young Katherine longed to know as much as she could about math, about the universe. From Katherine’s early beginnings as a gifted student to her heroic accomplishments as a prominent mathematician at NASA, this is the story of a groundbreaking American woman who not only calculated the course of moon landings but, in turn, saved lives and made enormous contributions to history.”

My Own Words – “My Own Words is a selection of writings and speeches by Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on wide-ranging topics, including gender equality, the work ways of the Supreme Court, on being Jewish, on law and lawyers in opera, and on the value of looking beyond United States shores when interpreting the U.S. Constitution. Throughout her life, Justice Ginsburg has been (and continues to be) a prolific writer and public speaker. This book contains a sampling, selected by Justice Ginsburg and her authorized biographers Mary Hartnett and Wendy W. Williams. Justice Ginsburg has written the introduction to the book, and Hartnett and Williams introduce each chapter, giving biographical context and quotes gleaned from hundreds of interviews they have conducted. This is a fascinating glimpse into the life of one of America’s most influential women.”

Prove It on Me: New Negroes, Sex, and Popular Culture in the 1920s – “In the wake of the Great Migration of thousands of African Americans from the scattered hamlets and farms of the rural South to the nation’s burgeoning cities, a New Negro ethos of modernist cultural expression and potent self-determination arose to challenge white supremacy and create opportunities for racial advancement. In Prove it on Me, Erin D. Chapman explores the gender and sexual politics of this modern racial ethos and reveals the constraining and exploitative underside of the New Negro era’s vaunted liberation and opportunities. Chapman’s cultural history documents the effects on black. ProQuest (Firm) This title explores the sexual politics of the modern racial ethos and reveals the exploitative underside of the ‘New Negro’ era. Analyzing intersecting primitivism, consumerism, and New Negro patriarchal aspirations, this history investigates the uses made of black women in 1920s racial politics and popular culture.”

I Dissent: Ruth Bader Ginsburg Makes her Mark – “Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has spent a lifetime disagreeing: disagreeing with inequality, arguing against unfair treatment, and standing up for what’s right for people everywhere. This biographical picture book about the Notorious RBG tells the justice’s story through the lens of her many famous dissents, or disagreements”

Dissenter on the Bench: Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s Life and Work – “The life and career of the fiercely principled Supreme Court Justice, now a popular icon, with dramatic accounts of her landmark cases that moved the needle on legal protection of human rights, illustrated with b/w archival photographs”

Who is Gloria Steinem? – “Presents the life of the prominent feminist, highlighting her career and influence as a writer, political activist, and co-founder of “Ms.” magazine.”

Life in Motion: An Unlikely Ballerina – “Determination meets dance in this middle grade adaptation of the New York Times bestselling memoir by the first African-American principal dancer in American Ballet Theatre history, Misty Copeland. Life in Motion is a story for all the kids who dare to be different, dream bigger, and want to break stereotypes in whatever they do.”

Firebird: Ballerina Misty Copeland Shows a Young Girl How to Dance like the Firebrid – “American Ballet Theater soloist Misty Copeland encourages a young ballet student, with brown skin like her own, by telling her that she, too, had to learn basic steps and how to be graceful when she was starting out, and that some day, with practice and dedication, the little girl will become a firebird, too. Includes author’s note about dancers who led her to find her voice.”

Elizabeth Leads the Way: Elizabeth Cady Stanton and the Right to Vote  – “Elizabeth Cady Stanton stood up and fought for what she believed in. From an early age, she knew that women were not given rights equal to men. But rather than accept her lesser status, Elizabeth went to college and later gathered other like-minded women to challenge the right to vote. This inspiring story is about an extraordinary woman who changed America forever because she wouldn’t take no for an answer.”

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