115 years ago the “unsinkable”, RMS Titanic, sank.

By Jacob Kinsman

Titanic-rms-titanic-6973534-550-309

On April 12, 1912 the ‘unsinkable’ RMS Titanic departed Southampton, England for New York City, New York, but the early morning of April 15, 1912 the ship collided with an iceberg and sank.

The Titanic had been considered unsinkable because of its water compartment and funnel system. In the event of a hull breach, the compartments would seal, thus preventing the water from spreading throughout the ship. However, when the Titanic struck the iceberg, the opening in the hull was too large for the compartment system to compensate.

Over the course of a few hours the ship slowly sank. Of the 2,224 passengers and crew on board, only 1,514 survived the disaster. Passengers were split into three classes.  During the sinking the ‘women and children first’ rule was instated so most of the casualties were men. While first-class passengers did drown,  drastically larger numbers of second and third class passengers perished.

The sinking of the Titanic has been a popular topic since the incident in 1912. To learn more about the only voyage of the RMS Titanic check out our resources available through the Rohrbach Library!

 

Advertisements

0 Responses to “115 years ago the “unsinkable”, RMS Titanic, sank.”



  1. Leave a Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 115 other followers

The Elusive Sea Cow Tweets

Rohrbach Library Tweets

Archives

Categories

Blog Stats

  • 1,838,551 hits

Affiliates



Kutztown University is part of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education.

%d bloggers like this: